Month: November 2022

2022 ABA Legal Technology Survey Report: Technology Basic & Security






The 2022 ABA Legal Technology Survey Report: Technology Basic & Security is now available for purchase!

The ABA Legal Technology Survey Report is the most comprehensive study available of lawyers’ actual technology use, spanning a vast range of topics from security and basic office software to technology budgets, marketing tools, and much more. The survey has been published annually for more than 20 years.

The 2022 edition features five volumes, each with detailed charts, tables, and trends: 2022 ABA Legal Technology Survey Report: Combined Volumes I-V

Vol. II: Technology Basics & Security

  • Technology Budget & Goals
  • Technology Training & Support
  • Technology Policies
  • Security Tools
  • Security Breaches
  • Viruses/Spyware/Malware
  • Backup





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Cybersecurity

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Six million Americans carried guns daily in 2019, twice as many as in 2015 | US gun control

An estimated 6 million American adults carried a loaded handgun with them daily in 2019, double the number who said they carried a gun every day in 2015, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Public Health.

The new estimates highlight a decades-long shift in American gun ownership, with increasing percentages of gun owners saying they own firearms for self-defense, not hunting or recreation, and choosing to carry a gun with them when they go out in public, said ​Ali Rowhani-Rahbar, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington, and the study’s lead author.

A landmark supreme court case this summer overturned a New York law that placed strict limits on public gun-carrying, ruling, for the first time, that Americans had a constitutional right to carry a handgun for self-defense outside the home.

While recent surveys show that nearly a third of American adults say

Continue Reading Six million Americans carried guns daily in 2019, twice as many as in 2015 | US gun control

No-Code Legal Automation Platform Josef Raises $3.5M to Fuel Further U.S. and In-House Expansion

Josef, an Australia-based, no-code software platform that enables legal professionals to automate common tasks, today said it has raised AU$5.2 million, or approximately $3.5 million in U.S. dollars, which it says it will use to further bolster its presence among enterprise customers. 

The company previously raised $2.5 million in 2021 and a seed round of $1 million in 2019.

“We’ll be using the new funds to further expand our U.S. presence and to reach more in-house legal teams, cementing our role as the infrastructure layer on which the future of automated legal service delivery is being built,” CEO Tom Dreyfus told me in an email.

This latest funding round was led by OIF Ventures, with participation from Carthona Capital, Flying Fox Ventures, Jelix Ventures and Saniel Ventures.

Josef was founded in Australia in 2017 by two lawyers, CEO Dreyfus and COO Sam Flynn, and engineer Kirill Kliavin,

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Can the American Law Institute Cure the Collection Claim Crisis for Courts, Creditors, and Consumers?

Every year, state courts process millions of low-dollar but highly consequential cases that shape the lives of Americans. Debt collection, eviction, foreclosure, and child support actions have long dominated civil court dockets and case volume is on the rise. Debt collection claims have more than doubled over the past twenty years as unsecured consumer credit became more widely available. What’s troubling is that these claims are frequently uncontested, resulting in a high rate of default judgments, seizures of property, wage garnishments, and other modes of enforcement.

The American Law Institute (ALI) recently launched an ambitious project to find a cure for this crippling crisis and they seem to have the perfect “doctor” (the JD/Ph.D. kind) for the job: Stanford Law School Professor David Freeman Engstrom whose impressive CV overflows with all the right credentials and an undeniable devotion to equal access to justice. These are his goals:

The project will

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This Year, I’m Thankful That Law Schools Ditching US News Rankings Might Make My Book Obsolete

yale dbU.S. News & World Report began ranking law schools in 1990. Every year since — a period of more than three decades — Yale Law School secured the No. 1 spot on the U.S. News list.

Yale’s reign at the top of the U.S. News rankings may be over, however. On November 16, Yale Law School announced that it would henceforth opt out of U.S. News & World Report’s list of top law schools.

Other highly ranked law schools quickly jumped on the bandwagon. As I write this, nine of the T-14 law schools (the most highly ranked schools on the U.S. News list) have pledged to stop submitting the internal data the publication needs to compile its list.

There are a lot of good reasons to detest the U.S. News law school rankings. Even so, it’s not exactly clear what gave rise to the big pullout now, after

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